News

Topics Classes

NetClassroom registration for Adrian College’s Fall 2019 undergraduate courses opened for Honors students and students with at least 90 credits at 12:01 a.m. on March 31, for all students with at least 54 credits on April 3, and for all other students on April 5.

Surely, many students have already registered, and a good portion of those who have not are more than likely to have looked over the course schedule and drawn up a plan. These plans, however, are sometimes less than ideal — particularly when a student needs to take electives within his or her major or minor, only to discover that none of the options seem particularly interesting or relevant to his or her academic interests.

If this describes your current situation — or if you are just looking to add unique courses to meet the 12 credit requirement for full-time student status — consider taking a topics course. Each of these courses, labelled as “Topics:” on the course schedule, is described by the Adrian College 2018-2019 Undergraduate Academic Catalog as an “in depth study of a special topics or theme reflecting a special or current topic of interest or reflecting specialized knowledge and experience of a given professor.”

Due to the fact that topics courses are always in flux, none are described in the Academic Catalog. Given that some students may not be willing to sign up for a class they know nothing about, The College World is reporting exclusive descriptions of several Fall 2019 topics courses.

Neuropharmacology (BIOL309a – 1), a three credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Marti Morales-Ensign (mmorales@adrian.edu) 10-10:50 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday in Peelle 316. It counts toward a student’s 30 required credit hours of 300-400 level courses. The prerequisite can be either Principles of Genetics (BIOL 221) or Microbiology (BIOL 326).

Morales-Ensign, an associate professor of biology at Adrian College, described Neuropharmacology as follows: “Pharmacology is the study of drug effects in the body. Neuropharmacology focuses specifically on how drugs affect the central and peripheral nervous systems. This course will focus primarily on the physiological effects on the nervous system caused by therapeutic drug treatments and the problems from addiction and abuse of drugs.”

Cardiovascular Physiology (ESAT390a – 1), a three credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Timothy Rotarius (trotarius@adrian.edu) 6-8:50 p.m. on Wednesday in Merillat Sport and Fitness Center 149. It counts toward a student’s 30 required credit hours of 300-400 level courses. The prerequisites are Human Physiology (ESAT 250) and Exercise Physiology (ESAT 311).

Rotarius, a professor of exercise science and athletic training at Adrian College, described Cardiovascular Physiology as follows: “A one semester look into the complex nature of the cardiovascular system through the lens of peer-reviewed research and the interplay between the heart and all of the other systems of the human body. We will look at the control of variables such as stroke volume and heart rate, as well as, blood flow control at rest and during exercise. Finally, we will end the semester with a brief overview of pathophysiology in the cardiovascular system.”

Clinical Exercise Physiology (ESAT390b – 1), a three credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Erin Garmyn (egarmyn@adrian.edu) 8-8:50 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday in Merillat Sport and Fitness Center 149. It counts toward a student’s 30 required credit hours of 300-400 level courses. Email Garmyn for information about prerequisites.

Garmyn, an assistant professor of exercise science and athletic training at Adrian College, described Clinical Exercise Physiology as follows: “Clinical Exercise Physiology introduces several diseases and conditions that students will become more familiar with. Not only will students gain a more thorough understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases and conditions, but they will also learn the scope of the disease/condition, the signs and symptoms of the disease/condition, and finally, they will understand how exercise can be used to improve their quality of life. They will learn how to interpret physiological assessments with hands-on activities that will help them better design an exercise program for these special populations of people.”

Women in Medieval Europe (HIST286b – 1), a one credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Michael McGrath (mmcgrath@adrian.edu) 2:30-3:45 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday in Peelle 316. It counts toward a student’s three to four required credit hours of humanities courses, and there are no prerequisites.

McGrath, a professor of history at Adrian College, described Women in Medieval Europe as follows: “We will be reading women’s experience of medieval Europe in their own words — how did they experience the fall of the Roman empire, the Germanic invasions, Christianization of pagan Europe, growth of education, urbanization, the rise of universities, spread of popular religion and so on. How were women depicted in art? What role did they have in the development of Christianity? What did they write? ‘Women in Medieval Europe’ will look at how women were at the center of chivalry, romance and medicine.”

Feminist Models of Leadership, a three credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Melissa Stewart (mstewart@adrian.edu) 1-2:15 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday in Valade 316. It counts toward a student’s 30 required credit hours of 300-400 level courses. Email Stewart for information on course code and prerequisites.

Stewart, the director of the Institute for Study Abroad and a professor of philosophy and religion at Adrian College, described Feminist Models of Leadership as follows: “This course is designed to help future students in management and leadership roles, to understand how they could drive change in their own organizations to advance gender equality and inclusion and to understand the underlying reasons that lead to the incidents of sexual harassment at the workplace. This course also will analyze current models of leadership and why they continue to marginalize and and oppress women.”

Fantasy, Folklore and Fiction (RELG300 – 2), a three credit hour course, will be taught by Dr. Scott Elliot (selliott@adrian.edu) 10:30-11:45 a.m. on Monday and Wednesday in Valade 316. It counts toward a student’s 30 required credit hours of 300-400 level courses. The prerequisite is any course in Philosophy or Religion.

Elliot, an associate professor of philosophy and religion at Adrian College, described Fantasy, Folklore and Fiction as follows: “Fantasy, Folklore and Fiction is a 300-level topics course that will survey, through close readings of primary literature, a range of ancient stories from various cultures and traditions (e.g., Egyptian, Hebrew, Greek, Roman) that cover an assortment of subjects (e.g., the cosmos, the gods, afterlife, war, love, sex, humanity). The overarching theme of the course will be the diverse ways that individuals and groups invent and shape themselves through narrative.”In addition to the aforementioned topics courses, students can contact Dr. Tina Claiborne (tclaiborne@adrian.edu) for information on Emergency Medical Technician (ESAT390-P – 1) and Emergency Medical Technician Lab (ESAT390-Q – 1), Dr. Stacey Todaro (stodaro@adrian.edu) for information on Cognitive Science Lab (PSYC300j – 1) and Prof. Jennifer Towns (jtowns@adrian.edu) for information on Self-Care and Mindfulness for Professionals (SOCW331 – 1).

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